MAKE YOUR OWN PUMPKIN SPICE

FROM PHIL LEMPERT, SUPERMARKET GURU

It’s pumpkin spice season! And that means pumpkin spice items abound. From lattes to cookies, to pies, this flavorful mix can be found in every section of the market. Pumpkin spice is generally made up of five different flavorful and potent spices with health benefits to support all of your shoppers’ needs. Here is your guide to the five spices in pumpkin spice and the benefits you and your shoppers can expect this season.

Cinnamon has been used as a botanical medicine for over 4,000 years. The spice is obtained from the inner bark of several varieties of a tropical evergreen tree (genus, Cinnamomum). Many of its healing and health promoting properties are attributed to its essential oils and phytonutrients. The range of health applications and anecdotal applications are broad, and range from boosting cognitive function and memory, treating rheumatism, helping with digestion and relieving certain menstrual disorders, regulating blood sugar, as well as inhibiting bacterial growth; making it an effective natural food preservative.

Ginger is not just great in stir-fries; it exhibits antioxidant effects and the ability to lessen the formation of inflammation in the brain (similar to turmeric). Gingerol is the compound responsible for ginger’s many benefits including the ability to significantly help with nausea, vomiting, and morning sickness. It is a powerful antioxidant and is thought to relax blood vessels, stimulate blood flow and relieve pain. Ginger is also thought to aid in the protection against certain cancers.

Allspice is the cured, unripe berry from a tropical evergreen tree. It is also commonly called Jamaica pepper, pimenta, or pimento and is native to Central America, parts of the Caribbean, and Mexico. Allspice is known for it’s anti-inflammatory benefits, supporting digestive health, boosting the immune system and more. Specifically it is rich in fiber, vitamin C, calcium, iron and magnesium.

Nutmeg is one of two spices that grow on an evergreen tree with the scientific classification Myristica fragrans, also known as common nutmeg. It is native to islands near Indonesia, but is now a globally used spice – thank you pumpkin spice products! Mace also comes from the same tree. Nutmeg is the dried ground seed, which contains fiber, magnesium, b6, folate and more. It is purported to benefit inflammation, brain health, circulation, boost immunity and more.

Cloves are the unopened pink flower buds of the evergreen clove tree. The buds are picked by hand when they are pink and dried until they turn brown in color. Cloves are nutritionally dense, specifically a great source of manganese, as well as vitamin K and fiber. They are also a good source of iron, magnesium, and calcium. In addition, clove contains significant amounts eugenol, which has been the subject of numerous health studies, including studies on the prevention of toxicity from environmental pollutants, digestive tract cancers, and joint inflammation.

The traditional pumpkin spice recipe includes:
6 parts ground cinnamon
1 parts ground nutmeg
1 part ground ginger
1/2 part ground allspice

Posted on October 31, 2016 at 12:02 am by Rabbi Jeffrey Rappoport · Permalink
In: General Topics, Health, Holidays, Kosher Desserts, Kosher Kitchen, Uncategorized

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