SKILLET POTATOES

THIS IS A GREAT RECIPE WE GOT OFF THE MR. FOOD BLOG. WE LOVE IT!

Have you ever thought about how the simplest foods taste the best? This classic recipe for easy Skillet Potatoes may have traveled through time from the fifties, but it still works today!
What You’ll Need:

6 potatoes, washed and thinly sliced
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper

What To Do:

1. Fill a medium saucepan three-quarters full with water and bring to a boil over high heat. Add potatoes and cook 10 to 12 minutes, or until fork-tender; drain and set aside.

2. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add sliced onions and saute 5 to 6 minutes, or until they start to brown.

3. Add potatoes, salt, and pepper to skillet; mix well and cook 15 to 17 minutes, or until potatoes are golden, turning occasionally.

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Posted on December 2, 2016 at 12:02 am by rebrapp · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: General Topics, Kosher Kitchen, Kosher Recipes

GENIUS HAS ITS LIMITS; STUPIDITY DOES NOT

FROM JANGLO (JERUSALEM ANGLOS) ON LINE

SEE OUR COMMENTS BELOW

This question actually came in in conversations a few times in the past week.

When I was a kid, I learned that the word הַלְּלוּיָ–הּ contains the name of Hashem, and therefore we shouldn’t say it in vain. Thus, outside the context of prayer or Torah study, the word should be pronounced “Halelukah.”

For those of us who have been discussing Leonard Cohen’s beautiful song “Halleuyah” since the singer died two weeks ago, the question is hotly relevant, but basically ignored.

Fortunately, Rabbi Aryeh Leibowitz put together a 10-minute discussion on the topic for YUTorah.org. Click the link to hear a complete discussion of the issue, from talmud to present day. Or if you just want the quick answer, here’s Rabbi Leibowitz’s take: There is good reason to be stringent, but there is sufficient room to be lenient.

There may be other opinions, and all questions should always be discussed with an authority that you personally know and trust.
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We must ask the author, Zev Stub, if he says Yisrael or Yisrakel? Does he call women named Talia, Talka? Both names contain a name of God according to Mr Stub. Is talcum powder really Talia powder, and someone changed the name? Granted it is a very old joke, but does Mr Stub say ginger kale, using the same logic?

Genius has its limits. Apparently narishkeit does not.

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Posted on December 1, 2016 at 12:01 am by rebrapp · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: General Topics

FLAMOUS ORIGINAL FALAFEL, MULTI GRAIN ZATAR CHIPS

PRESS RELEASE

Flamous released two new flavors of chips: Sprouted Multi-grain Zatar and Original Falafel. Based on an ancient Mediterranean spice blend of thyme and sesame, the Zatar chips use the power of micronutrients through the sprouted grains of brown flax, buckwheat and brown rice. They are a gluten-free alternative to croutons and pair with yogurt-based dips.

With more than 21 herbs, vegetables, spices and legumes, the Original Falafel chips have a unique recipe. A good source of protein, fiber and antioxidants, they are non-GMO verified and are certified as 100% USDA Organic, gluten-free, vegan and kosher. (Kof-K)

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Posted on November 30, 2016 at 12:02 am by rebrapp · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: General Topics, Health, Kosher Kitchen, Kosher New Products, Kosher News

AH YES, THE CHIEF RABBINATE STRIKES AGAIN

FROM THE TIMES OF ISRAEL NEWSPAPER

The Chief Rabbinate in Jerusalem revoked the kosher certification of one Israeli importer of Jack Daniel’s whiskey, while leaving in place the license for the drink’s official importer to the country, even though the whiskey sold by both importers apparently comes from the same factory.

Uri Zror, the owner of Paneco Group, appealed to the High Court of Justice over the revocation of his company’s kosher certification, according to a Channel 10 report. He argued that there was no religious ground for its removal, as “the product is kosher, it is the exact same product as the official importer’s.” He said that even “religious Jews drink it.”

Zror told Channel 10 that his company sells Jack Daniel’s for an average price of NIS 119 shekels (approx. $30), while the official importer sells a bottle for an average price of NIS 149 (approx. $38). He said that the kosher certification industry in Israel upholds a monopoly, because “when the price is high, people earn more.”

He added that kosher certification is used as means of limiting market access for many products, which in turn drives up the price. If a company does not have a kosher certificate, he said, “it is impossible to sell it in many places, and that is how they control the price.”

In a January interview with the Tel Aviv-based publication the TLV Times, Zror bragged that “our prices are cheaper than duty free,” and said that while his company earns less per bottle than its competitors, it makes up for it with more bottles sold.

Whiskey is traditionally made from distilled grain. It is often given its flavor by maturing in casks that have previously contained sherry. The sherry draws the flavor of the wood from the cask. Sherry, wine and grape juice are only considered kosher if they were manufactured by Jews. However, since the sherry itself is present in the whiskey in tiny quantities and only acts as a catalyst, many rabbinic authorities consider all whiskey to be kosher.

By Israeli law, food products may only be imported if they win the approval of the Israeli rabbinate, regardless of whether they are also certified by a foreign kosher authority. Therefore, by removing certification from competing importers, the rabbinate is in effect able to create monopolies and keep prices artificially high.

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We are not a big fan of Jack Daniels- there are other bourbons we prefer- but kosher is kosher. The same product can’t be kosher in one place and not kosher in a second place.

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Posted on November 29, 2016 at 12:02 am by rebrapp · Permalink · Leave a comment
In: General Topics, Kosher News